IRS intends to reestablish IRPAC

The IRS intends to reestablish the Information Reporting Program Advisory Committee (IRPAC) for a period of one year beginning January 5, 2018. The IRPAC is the only advisory committee designed to focus on information reporting issues. Its members usually come from the tax professional community, small and large businesses, financial institutions, state tax administration agencies, colleges and universities and securities and payroll organizations. IRPAC conveys the public’s perception of IRS activities, provides advice with respect to specific information reporting administration issues, provides constructive observations regarding current or proposed IRS policies, programs and procedures and proposes improvements to information reporting operations and the Information Reporting Program. The members are expected to have specific subject matter and technical expertise in information reporting administration issues, including knowledge and expertise in producing and using information reporting returns. (Notice of Intent to Reestablish IRPAC, December 21, 2017.)

Here are the 2018 minimum wage rates

Federal rate—$7.25 per hour (Unchanged).
Alabama—No state minimum wage rate. Employers subject to the federal FLSA must pay employees the federal rate of $7.25 per hour.
Alaska—$9.84 per hour. School bus drivers must be paid two times the minimum wage rate (The State of Alaska, Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Administrative Services Division, Research and Analysis Section, Minimum wage Determination, October 3, 2017).
Arizona—$10.50 per hour. Arizona’s state minimum wage does not apply to small businesses that have less than $500,000 in annual gross revenue and that are exempt under federal law.
Arkansas—$8.50 per hour (unchanged).
California—$11 per hour for employers with 26 employees or more. $10.50 for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
Colorado—$10.20 per hour. $7.18 per hour for tipped employees.
Connecticut—$10.10 per hour (unchanged).
Delaware—$8.25 per hour (unchanged).
District of Columbia—$12.50 per hour (Effective as of July 1, 2017; increases to $13.25 per hour on
July 1, 2018).
Florida—$8.25 per hour (Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, 2018 Florida Minimum Wage Calculations, October 13, 2017).
Georgia—$5.15 per hour (Unchanged). This rate applies to employers with 6 or more employees and sales of over $40,000 a year. Employers subject to the federal FLSA must pay employees the federal rate of $7.25 per hour.
Hawaii—$10.10 per hour.
Idaho—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Illinois—$8.25 per hour.
Indiana—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Iowa—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Kansas—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Kentucky—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Louisiana—No state minimum wage rate. Employers subject to the federal FLSA must pay employees the federal rate of $7.25 per hour.
Maine—$10 per hour.
Maryland—$9.25 per hour (Effective as of July 1, 2017; Effective July 1, 2018, $10.10 per hour).
Massachusetts—$11.00 per hour (unchanged).
Michigan—$9.25 per hour.
Minnesota—$9.65 per hour.
$7.87 per hour for employees of small employers. Large employers are those businesses with annual gross revenues of $500,000 or more. Smaller employers are those with annual gross revenues of less than $500,000.
The youth rate of $7.87 per hour may be paid to employees younger than 18 years of age (Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry, News Release, August 17, 2017).
Mississippi—No state minimum wage rate. Employers subject to the federal FLSA must pay employees the federal rate of $7.25 per hour.
Missouri—$7.85 per hour. Tipped employees, half the minimum wage (wages plus tips must total at least
$7.85 per hour). All businesses are required to pay the minimum wage rate, except for retail and service businesses whose annual gross sales are less than $500,000.
Montana—$8.30 per hour. For employers whose gross annual sales are $110,000 or less, employers may pay employees a minimum wage rate of $4.00 per hour (However, if an individual is producing or moving goods between states or is otherwise covered by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, the employee must be paid the greater of either the state or federal minimum wage rates.
Nebraska—$9.00 per hour. Applies to employees of employers having four or more employees.
Nevada—$7.25 per hour if a qualified health insurance plan is offered (unchanged). $8.25 per hour if no qualified health insurance plan (unchanged).
New Hampshire—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
New Jersey—$8.60 per hour. New Jersey State Wage and Hour Law Abstract (MW—220 (R—1—18), http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/forms_pdfs/lsse/mw—220.pdf).
New Mexico—$7.50 per hour (unchanged).
New York—Effective December 31, 2017, the minimum wage in New York is:
$13 per hour for large employers in New York City with 11 or more employees
$12 per hour for small employers in New York City with 10 or fewer employees
$11 per hour in Long Island and Westchester
$10.40 per hour for the remainder of the state.
North Carolina—$7.25 per hour (unchanged). Effective December 31, 2017, employers covered under the North Carolina Wage and Hour Act are required to display a poster summarizing the major provisions of the Act in every covered establishment.
North Dakota—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Ohio—$8.30 per hour. $4.15 per hour for tipped employees, plus tips. The minimum wage will apply to employees of businesses with annual gross receipts of more than $305,000 per year. Employers who gross less than $305,000 must pay employees no less than the current federal minimum wage rate, which is $7.25 per hour. Employees under the age of 16 must be paid no less than the current federal minimum wage rate, $7.25 per hour.
Oklahoma—$7.25 per hour (unchanged). The state minimum wage applies to employees of employers with at least 10 full—time employees at one location and for employees of employers who have gross sales of more than $100,000 annually (regardless of the number of employees).
Oregon—$10.25 per hour, except as noted below (effective as of July 1, 2017; $10.75 per hour July 1, 2018). $11.25 per hour, Metro Portland area (effective as of July 1, 2017; $12 per hour July 1, 2018). $10 per hour in rural (nonurban) counties (effective as of July 1, 2017; $10.50 per hour July 1, 2018).
Pennsylvania—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Puerto Rico—$7.25 per hour (unchanged). For workers not subject to the federal FLSA, employers must pay either not less than 70% of the federal minimum hourly wage rate ($5.08) or the applicable mandatory decree rate, whichever is higher. $4.25 per hour training wage for workers 25 years of age and younger, for the first 90 days of employment, per federal PROMESA (Public Law 114—187 (S. 2328),
L. 2016).
Rhode Island—$10.10 per hour.
South Carolina—No state minimum wage rate. Employers subject to the federal FLSA must pay employees the federal rate of $7.25 per hour.
South Dakota—$8.85 per hour. Tipped employees may be paid half the minimum wage ($4.425 per hour) (South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation, News Release, September 21, 2017).
Tennessee—No state minimum wage rate. Employers subject to the federal FLSA must pay employees the federal rate of $7.25 per hour.
Texas—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Utah—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Vermont—$10.50 per hour.
Virginia—$7.25 per hour (unchanged).
Washington—$11.50 per hour. $9.78 per hour, workers who are 14 or 15 years old (85% of the minimum wage).
West Virginia—$8.75 per hour (unchanged).
Wisconsin—$7.25 per hour (unchanged). $5.90 per hour opportunity wage.
Wyoming—$5.15 per hour (unchanged). Employers subject to federal law must pay employees $7.25 per hour.

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